Lies

What if everything you knew was a lie? But what if it wasn’t?

What if Christ was a myth created by the Roman Catholics and based on their sun-god religion that goes back from America to Rome, Greece, Egypt, Sumer, and Atlantis. But what if it was all real, and there really is “no way to the Father but through [Christ]”?

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Lies

Tent City

Read the article “Tent City, America” by Chris Herring at Places Journal.

I’ve seen the homeless panhandlers in every city I’ve lived in. I’ve never given one a single penny and I always wish they weren’t there. I’ve caught myself wishing “someone would do something about this,” which sounds terrible, I know, but I’m just being honest. And seriously, something should be done. I don’t have anything against the homeless, I just wish I didn’t have to explain to my child why all the people in all the cars just ignore that man who’s asking for help. There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a freegan, living off the land and/or city and/or generosity of others. Float free, fellow humans! If I weren’t married with kids, I’d happily quit society and join a commune. But still, the people Herring talks about in his “Tent City” expose could use a sensible solution to their problems.

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Tent City

Myths and History

“Genesis” and “Exodus” tell cosmic stories, myths, if you will. However, they are also read as history by some. How can these two opposing viewpoints–myth and history–be reconciled? What similarities do you see in these two books of the Old Testament and The Epic of Gilgamesh? What are the differences?

 

The way I was raised was to take every word of the Bible as the literal truth, sent directly from God’s mouth to the writers’ hands without error. Since then, my views have changed 180 degrees. Now, I lump the stories of the Bible in with The Epic of Gilgamesh and the thousands of other myths from around the world. After all, even though three of the world’s major religions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) accept the Old Testament or Torah as truth, that still leaves out pretty much all of Asia and the Native Peoples of the Americas.

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Myths and History

The Odyssey

The Odyssey of Homer is the first great piece of narrative literature of the Western World. What is the relevance of The Odyssey and its influence on the rest of world literature, including the epic, pastoral literature, and lyric and dramatic poetry?

Remember to quote from the readings to illustrate and prove your points, followed by MLA citation, both in-text and on a Works Cited page.

 

Homer’s literature, probably being written around 800 BCE, is classified as Preclassical. Well, we call it Homer’s literature, but it is most likely he was not the original author—he is just the one who gets the credit:

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The Odyssey

The Odyssey’s Cyclops, Polyphemus

The Odyssey is full of fabulous creatures. Choose any one of them and indicate how such an image might have come into being. What is its relevance to the story and to the world? What does Odysseus’ interaction with the creature, even if it is a demigod, say about the place of human beings in the world of the ancient Greeks? What powers does the creature have that humans do not possess? How does Odysseus overcome that limitation?

 

The fabulous creature from The Odyssey I would like to examine is one of the earliest, strangest direct encounters Odysseus has with supernatural obstacles he has to use his cunning and guile to overcome: that is the cyclops, Polyphemus.

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The Odyssey’s Cyclops, Polyphemus

The Oresteia Trilogy and the Curse on the House of Atreus

The events of The Oresteia Trilogy are the result of a curse on the House of Atreus. Research the Internet and recount the earlier events resulting from the curse. What do these events have to say about the importance of Fate in ancient Greek civilization? Where have we encountered the idea of Fate before?

Remember to quote from the readings to illustrate and prove your points, followed by MLA citation, both in-text and on a Works Cited page.

 

The curse of the House of Atreus plagued five generations of the family before Orestes finally put an end to it in the final play, The Eumenides, of Aeschylus’s Oresteia Trilogy. The importance of Orestes ending the curse is underscored by the fact that we refer to the trilogy of plays by his name, even though he is not in the first play, which is all about his father, Agamemnon.

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The Oresteia Trilogy and the Curse on the House of Atreus

Aristotle’s Poetics and Sophocles’s Oedipus

Find the short volume of Aristotle’s Poetics on the Internet and read about the importance of the “reversal” and “recognition” in ancient Greek tragedy. And instead of a “tragic flaw,” think about the central characters “error in judgment” (a better translation of Aristotle’s idea). In Sophocles’ Oedipus, identify the central character, his or her error in judgment, and the reversal and recognition he or she endures. Do the reversal and recognition occur at the same time? What advantages accrue from the reversal and recognition occurring at the same time? What are the disadvantages?

Aristotle calls this the perfect tragedy. Do you agree?

 

Aristotle’s “reversal,” called the “Peripeteia” in Greek, is defined as the turning point of a story. In Poetics, Aristotle writes, “Reversal of the Situation is a change by which the action veers round to its opposite, subject always to our rule of probability or necessity. Thus in the Oedipus, the messenger comes to cheer Oedipus and free him from his alarms about his mother, but by revealing who he is, he produces the opposite effect.”

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Aristotle’s Poetics and Sophocles’s Oedipus