The Aeneid and The Odysse

How does Virgil’s Aeneid compare to Homer’s Odyssey? How is it different?

 

Virgil took a minor character from Homer’s Iliad, Aeneas, and crafted his whole epic poem detailing the founding of Rome around him in the Aeneid. Virgil was writing six- or seven-hundred years later, and for the Romans instead of the Greeks, so of course his story is going to be different. One of the most striking differences to me was how he dealt with fate. Fate is a major element of the Iliad, but in the Odyssey, Homer evolves human interaction with this mysterious force and favors fortune over fate. In a way, Virgil turns the clock back and makes fate a major thing again. This time, however, fate is an even bigger deal, as the gods are even subject to its power.

Continue reading “The Aeneid and The Odysse”

Advertisements
The Aeneid and The Odysse

The Odyssey

The Odyssey of Homer is the first great piece of narrative literature of the Western World. What is the relevance of The Odyssey and its influence on the rest of world literature, including the epic, pastoral literature, and lyric and dramatic poetry?

Remember to quote from the readings to illustrate and prove your points, followed by MLA citation, both in-text and on a Works Cited page.

 

Homer’s literature, probably being written around 800 BCE, is classified as Preclassical. Well, we call it Homer’s literature, but it is most likely he was not the original author—he is just the one who gets the credit:

Continue reading “The Odyssey”

The Odyssey

The Odyssey’s Cyclops, Polyphemus

The Odyssey is full of fabulous creatures. Choose any one of them and indicate how such an image might have come into being. What is its relevance to the story and to the world? What does Odysseus’ interaction with the creature, even if it is a demigod, say about the place of human beings in the world of the ancient Greeks? What powers does the creature have that humans do not possess? How does Odysseus overcome that limitation?

 

The fabulous creature from The Odyssey I would like to examine is one of the earliest, strangest direct encounters Odysseus has with supernatural obstacles he has to use his cunning and guile to overcome: that is the cyclops, Polyphemus.

Continue reading “The Odyssey’s Cyclops, Polyphemus”

The Odyssey’s Cyclops, Polyphemus

The Odyssean Gods

odysseus

Homer’s portrayal of the gods and goddesses in The Odyssey is completely different from the majority of literatures’ handling of the Greek Gods, and even differs from Homer’s previous work, The Iliad. In most of literature dealing with these Greek Gods, including The Iliad, they are seen as true deities: omniscient and omnipresent, blamed or thanked for every bad or good thing that ever happens. However, with The Odyssey, we have a divergence from this literary theme. While the gods and goddesses are still there in The Odyssey, they are not omnipresent. While they are still all-knowing, they are often seen as more aloof than accepting of blame. In fact, while the gods are acknowledged by all of the characters in The Odyssey, they are more background characters, while the focus is on the human star of the epic, Odysseus. Indeed, most of the gods’ and goddesses’ roles in The Odyssey have them interacting with Odysseus.

Continue reading “The Odyssean Gods”

The Odyssean Gods